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Obstructed Vision on Apple Vision Pro Concerns San Diego Police

San Diego Police Department has safety concerns with a pedestrian wearing an Apple Vision Pro which obstructs vision as they are crossing the road.

San Diego Police Department have safety concern with obstructed vision on Apple Vision Pro
Apple Vision Pro on display stand. Credit: Shuttershock/RingoChui

The San Diego Police Department posted an Instagram video showing an individual crossing the street wearing the recently released Apple Vision Pro Headset. This came as a safety concern to the SDPD due to obstructed vision in situations that require your full attention. In an Instagram post, the SDPD requested users “to keep virtual experiences on the sidewalk.

In an Instagram post posted by the San Diego Police Department, a nearby pedestrian is approaching the crosswalk. Nearby, three police are actively detaining someone. The pedestrian appears to be wearing the latest technology from Apple, which is the Apple Vision Pro headset. The sight of a man wearing unfamiliar technology catches the eye of one of the police officers.

The Police Department later posted to Instagram to express their safety concerns of pedestrians with obstructed vision while performing activities that require their full attention to be safe. A quote from their Instagram post explains…

“It was a sight that had us pausing in bewilderment. While we’re all for exploring new dimensions and technology, let’s remember the importance of pedestrian safety. Keep those virtual experiences on the sidewalk, folks, and let’s cross streets the old-fashioned way – with our eyes wide open to the real world, unobstructed and without distractions!”

Credit: Instagram/sandiegopd

Safe Usage While Having Obstructed Vision

What is the Apple Vision Pro? The Apple Vision Pro is the latest form of augmented reality technology. The headset costs $3,500 and lets the user use many apps while also seeing the real world. The peripheral vision is blocked and appears black. But users can still see in front of them.

The SDPD’s concerns are valid; the Apple user guide addresses these concerns about the usage of the headset. The safety guide for the headset addresses what you should pay attention to when you can’t see normally.

The High-Consequence Activity section touches on the subject. Apple says it’s not intended for use in areas where the device could lead to death, personal injury, or severe environmental damage.

The Surroundings section of the guide informs you of the required situations of when to pay attention to safety. It advises to always remain aware of your environment and your body posture while in use. The headset should also be used in controlled areas that are safe such as a level surface. The guide advises that you don’t operate near stairs, balconies, or railings. As well as glass, mirrors, sharp objects, sources of excessive heat, windows, or other hazards. Apple says never operate a moving vehicle, bicycle, or heavy machinery when you have blocked vision.

These concerns about safety in the guide have already happened. There have been reports of users wearing the headset while driving their Teslas in autopilot. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg was concerned by the matter. He spoke out on X telling Vision Pro users that their full attention needed to be on the road. Autopilot or not.

Mixed Opinions From Viewers

Viewers of the video on Instagram all had varying opinions on the situation. Some commenters saw the new technology could set the world in a bad direction. Instagram commenter @drganfgre31 stated, “This is sad and weird at the same time.” The reply disagreed and user @pzoozled stated “It’s actually great. Not sad at all.”

Other Instagram users questioned the legitimacy of the police department’s concerns. Commenters challenged the idea that the headset would cause safety issues as you can see your surroundings behind whatever is on the screen. Commenter @beth_farella states “He crossed with the light though. @molly_d_m replied to the comment saying “He can still see the outside world,” trying to make sense of the concerns of the Police. In a YouTube short posted by @Do.It.Differently, you can see exactly what the user of the headset saw as he was crossing the street:

Other users were seeing this situation from the standpoint that this is scary and a threat to our well-being. One commenter pointed out that they feel that we are headed in the direction of the Disney film Wall-E. The futuristic people in the film lived on spacecrafts and no longer had mobility because they had motorized seats. Instagram user @_shawtygot_lo_ said, “Let’s all remember the movie Wall-e! Make it stop.” Another commenter was equally concerned about the state of our future with the upcoming new technology. @dfish79 stated, “The future is here and it’s scary. Not the cops, the AI in this world.”

All viewers had valid points that led to different points of discussion that we should pay attention to. What is your view on the video and the new Apple Vision Pro?

Written By

Jessica is a recent graudate of Kutztown University of Pennsylvania with a B.A. in Communication Studies. Jessica enjoys books, video games, crafts, discovering new rock music to listen to.

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