On August 1, We’ve Used Up 2018’s Supply Of The Earth’s Natural Resources

Image via NASA

On August 1st, We Will Have Already Used Up 2018’s Supply Of Earth’s Natural Resources.

But what does this mean for us? Is this the impending apocalypse? Will the world end?

No. The human race is set to continue to live its lavish lifestyle. Each year the NGO Global Footprint Network calculates that date on which humankind has consumed all of the resources which the planet is capable of regenerating in a year.

This is Earth Overshoot Day, which is similar to a report card, helping us to consider if we are using our natural resources wisely and sustainably?

At the moment, evidently not. In 2018, it would take 1.7 earth’s to replenish the natural resources we will collectively use up as a planet. We only have the one. So if by August 1st, 2018, we will have consumed a whole year’s worth of the planet’s resources starting August 2nd, we begin the earth’s savings account basically. We can only deplete so much of you natural resources until its gone.

Global Footprint Network has also gone further and produced an image showing what Earth Overshoot days would look like from different countries, given that some countries use up more of earth’s resources than others.

Image via Business Insider/Global Footprint Network

According to 2017 Global Footprint Network data, as reported by the World Wildlife Fund, the US is a close second to Australia in being a resource hog.

The WWF report shows that it would take five plants to support humanity for a year if everyone lived the way Americans do. To prove this, the Country Overshoot Day for the US came on March 15, in 2018, less than a quarter of the way through the year.

Everyone’s Responsibility

How can we reverse this trend? These shocking figures are a reflection of our culture of excessive consumption.  But this trend can be reversed through political action and change in individuals.

For example, replacing 50% of our meat consumption with a vegetarian diet would push the overlook date back by five days, according to The Guardian. To get an idea of your individual impact, Global Footprint Network also offers an application which calculates your personal Earth Overshoot Day.

For more appreciation of the Earth, BBC discreetly released hours of Planet Earth footage. Check it out here.zzyyewxvzvxfxrrcczadwqrfuxyas

Hi! I'm Davina and I am a second year English student at the University of Lincoln. I love reading YA in all its cringe entirety. I write to procrastinate, and hopefully, for a living.

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