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Pig kidney works a record 2 months in donated body, raising hope for animal-human transplants

Revolutionary pig kidney transplants: tackling organ shortages. Explore the latest xenotransplant breakthroughs!

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Image Source: CHIRATH PHOTO@shutterstock

Hold onto your hats, folks, ’cause we’ve got some groundbreaking news coming your way! Picture this: a pig kidney, yes, you heard that right, a pig’s kidney, not only made itself comfortable inside a human body but stuck around for a whopping two months, setting a record in the world of xenotransplants!

Back in July, the brainiacs at NYU Langone Health did the unthinkable. They took a genetically tweaked pig kidney and gave it a new home inside a fellow named Maurice Miller, affectionately known as Mo. Now, why’d they do this, you might ask? Well, Mo had a brain tumor, and things were looking grim. But these mad scientists were up for the challenge.

Fast forward 61 days, and there it was, D-day, or should I say K-day? The day they pulled that porcine organ out of Mo’s body. But here’s the twist – it wasn’t just any old transplant; it was a pre-clinical human experiment, folks!

Now, you might wonder, what’s the next move in this bizarre medical chess game? Well, brace yourselves ’cause these scientists are on a roll. They’re diving headfirst into the nitty-gritty of this study. They’re going to dissect their findings, poke around the body’s reaction to this piggy procedure, and get ready to take this show to the big leagues – clinical trials on living, breathing humans!

Hold your horses; it ain’t all smooth sailing. During this wild ride, they stumbled upon some “novel cellular changes.” Yeah, you guessed it, that’s science-speak for some funky stuff happening inside. But don’t you worry, they’ve got their immunosuppression meds to tackle that mild rejection head-on. Overall, though, that kidney did a bang-up job, performing like a rock star.

Dr. Robert Montgomery, the maestro behind this crazy symphony of science, couldn’t be happier. He’s gushing about all the lessons they’ve learned and the bright future ahead. He’s singing praises to Mo’s family for making all of this possible. Thanks to them, we might just be one step closer to cracking the code on this organ shortage crisis!

But wait, there’s more! In August, another gang of brainiacs from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Heersink School of Medicine made waves. They published some peer-reviewed research that spilled the beans on transplanting pig kidneys into humans. And guess what? These kidneys didn’t just sit there; they rolled up their sleeves and started producing urine. Talk about making themselves useful!

Now, it’s not all sunshine and rainbows. There’s still a long road ahead, more studies to be done, especially in living human guinea pigs – I mean, recipients. But these scientists are brimming with hope. They’re seeing progress, and they’re daring to dream that piggy kidneys could be the bridge or even the destination for folks battling end-stage kidney disease.

Dr. Adam Griesemer, the guy who knows a thing or two about these piggy parts, spilled the beans at a press conference. He’s telling us that we’ve spent two decades learning how pig kidneys work in primates, but what we didn’t know was whether that knowledge would hold up in the human arena. And now, for the very first time, we’re getting those answers. It’s like music to our ears, and it’s also giving the FDA a little nudge toward green-lighting phase one clinical trials.

Now, here’s the kicker – most folks on the organ transplant waitlist are crossing their fingers for a kidney. We’re talking a whopping 89,000 souls, folks! That’s where these piggy pioneers come into play, offering a glimmer of hope to those in need. So, stay tuned, folks, ’cause the future’s looking mighty interesting in the world of transplants!

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